Silver Creek Digital Silver Print

I just framed my first digital silver print. I'm very happy with the results and will try and use this process with most and eventually all of my black and white printing. I have been teetering on the edge (when considering shooting to make a print. I will likely always have a digital camera with me) of ditching the digital cameras and replacing them with film as I have not been really satisfied with the black and white giclee prints I am getting with my digital files. The digital silver printing method however has reversed my course to shoot film.

For those not familiar with the digital silver process here are a few of the specs. Again, this process is done with digital files:

  • Digital file exposed on light sensitive photo paper
  • Processed in liquid chemistry

The photo paper in my case is, "true silver gelatin baryta based paper." It's also:

  • White paper base with warmer image tones
  • Processed in liquid chemistry to archival standards
  • Ideal for exhibitions, portfolios and fine art prints
  • Superior silver content for richer tones and shadow detail

The printer I am using is Digital Silver Imaging in Belmont, MA.

A Bend In The River

The print is 16" X 24" and signed, titled and dated en verso. The dimensions of the frame are approx. 32" X 24 1/4". There is also approx 2 3/4" white matting.

Framed: $1,000 plus shipping & tax

Print (unframed): $650 plus shipping and tax

  • Other sizes are available. Contact me with any inquiries.

To contact me to make a purchase or for inquiries use the form on the top, right hand side of this page OR email: nickpricephotography@gmail.com

Release. Silver Creek.

A fall release.

Release. Fall. Silver Creek, Idaho.

Below is a quote from the author David James Duncan in the documentary film, Damnation. He is talking about hatchery steelhead and salmon versus wild:

The wild fish are genetically diverse whereas a hatchery clone is a bunch of first cousins fucking first cousins you know. So you end up with a bunch of badeeps. They are immediately being inbred out of existence. It really is like trying to replace, Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart with Yanni, Yanni and Yanni. No diversity.
— David James Duncan